appearances

Talking on radio, television, film, podcasts, etc.

Tortured Data and DC Schools

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              Update April 26, 2016: Thanks to WPFW’s David Whettstone for having me on for an hour to talk about this subject. Update: March 31,  2016: Thanks to Washington Post education columnist Valerie Strauss for crossposting this piece on her blog, The Answer Sheet.   They say if you torture numbers long enough, they’ll tell you whatever you want. Today, I had three minutes to distill 15 years of frustration as Keep Reading

Natalie’s 2013 Year in Review

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2013 has been an amazing year. I met new collaborators and stumbled upon new ways to think out loud, from live storytelling on stage, to community conversations about art and education in Miami, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Atlanta and New Orleans.  My book Go-Go Live was recognized by the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award nomination and I published essays and interviews in The Root, The Washington Post and Essence Magazine. I taught a graduate seminar Keep Reading

Go-Go Live: Banned in Chevy Chase

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I was joking on Twitter the day before I was scheduled to read and sign “Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City” at Politics & Prose, the legendary bookstore near the Chevy Chase neighborhood, one of the city’s whitest and wealthiest corners of D.C. “Putting together my go-go mix to play at my #GOGOLIVE signing @Politics_Prose tomorrow.” I tweeted. “Chevy Chase might not be ready…” Apparently, it isn’t. Keep Reading

Talking to Kojo Nnambdi about “Go-Go Live”

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The host at the NPR local affiliate WAMU Kojo Nnambdi and I had a conversation about my book Go-Go Live. Kojo went to the same Georgetown, Guyana high school a couple of years before my dad, Terrence Hopkinson. I met Kojo again at the 2011 Guyana Cultural Association’s conference at CUNY during Labor Day weekend as part as the Caribbean day festival in Brooklyn.
I really enjoyed the conversation. I Keep Reading

At Chuck Brown’s wake

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Here was a WUSA segment I was on at the viewing for Chuck Brown. I tweeted this pic of Linda Boyd, a fan of Chuck’s who last saw him perform at LaFontaine Bleu wedding chapel. She framed the Washington Post portrait of Chuck.

WNYC Soundcheck on Go-Go Live

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Believe it or not I had already been working with a producer from WNYC’s (New York City’s NPR affiliate) for a segment on my book when news hit of Chuck Brown’s passing. So the segment  just became even more timely. I spent a 1/2 hour on the show, listening to music and talking about Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City. Listen HERE

The Brian Lehrer Show: MLK Memorial – WNYC

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  The Brian Lehrer Show: MLK Memorial – WNYC Here I defended the new Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, D.C. from the art critics and China haters. It is a beautiful tribute.  I love his pose. I even love him coming out of the mountain. Sometimes the best art is simple and direct.

In the Chocolate City| ABC Australia

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In the summer of 2010, I spent some time with Australian journalists doing a documentary on the nation’s capital, and the dichotomy of a black president and a shrinking black population in the city. They did an excellent job weaving go-go music to the larger political and economic forces shaping the District of Columbia. See it here at http://www.abc.net.au/foreign/content/2010/s2959326.htm

ABC on Cracker Johnson House

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To commemorate the 100th anniversary of Palm Beach County, an ABC TV affiliate featured me and my mom and our Cracker Johnson House project. This 4 minute video (plays after the commercial) gives a great overview of Cracker Johnson’s historical significance and the amazing story of how we stumbled upon it. The camera crew followed me when I found Cracker Johnson’s grave for the first time in a segregated cemetery plot in West Palm Beach. Watch the video.

Talking Back to Cathy Hughes NPR

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  I wrote an essay for The Root: “Why No One Talks Back to Cathy Hughes” blasting the Radio One mogul for her nasty, legacy-staining radio propaganda campaign targeting some members of Congress over music royalties.   Later I appeared on on NPR to discuss Radio One’s beef with the Congressional Black Caucus. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120769839