Other PUBLICATIONS

Future of the Arts & Society Project is now LIVE

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My project with the Interactivity Foundation has now been sent to the printers! It is a FREE  download for schools and communities to frame conversations about the arts and public policy. Big shoutout to Art Director Calida Rawles for her work on the design of the glossy mag. Free printed copies are available by request. Email arts@interactivityfoundation.org    

No Congas, No Go-Go

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  Every year for Howard University’s Homecoming, my husband and I open our home not far from the school’s Washington D.C. campus to our fellow alumni from all over the country for food, drink and fellowship until the wee hours. Last homecoming, in honor of the publication of my book Go-Go Live, our friend, Dan Cooper, decided to up the ante. He hired a go-go band to play. I was skeptical they would fit Keep Reading

Go-Go Live: Banned in Chevy Chase

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I was joking on Twitter the day before I was scheduled to read and sign “Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City” at Politics & Prose, the legendary bookstore near the Chevy Chase neighborhood, one of the city’s whitest and wealthiest corners of D.C. “Putting together my go-go mix to play at my #GOGOLIVE signing @Politics_Prose tomorrow.” I tweeted. “Chevy Chase might not be ready…” Apparently, it isn’t. Keep Reading

New York Times: Farewell to Chocolate City

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In my essay in the New York Times Sunday Review from June 2012, I wax nostalgic about the end of Washington, D.C.’s majority-black status. This piece boiled down many of the arguments from my book, “Go-Go Live.” To me, go-go is like the rose that grew in concrete–against all odds. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/24/opinion/sunday/farewell-to-chocolate-city.html  

Why School Choice Fails – NYTimes.com

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Why School Choice Fails – NYTimes.com. By Natalie Hopkinson IF you want to see the direction that education reform is taking the country, pay a visit to my leafy, majority-black neighborhood in Washington. While we have lived in the same house since our 11-year-old son was born, he’s been assigned to three different elementary schools as one after the other has been shuttered. Now it’s time for middle school, and there’s been no neighborhood option available. Keep Reading

Segregated Museums Mirror History: NPR

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    The Root: Segregated Museums Mirror History : NPR. Will white people visit a black museum? Rep. Jim Moran of Virginia said no. I say, is that what really matters?